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bass flute Bite for solo bass flute contemporary music extended techniques multiphonics practice

Multiphonics for Saunders Bite

I am very pleased that a number of young flutists are learning Rebecca Saunder’s Bite for solo bass flute. However, I am a bit ashamed that I did not have a good look at the multiphonic table in the earliest versions and insist on alternatives and corrections. Better late than never! Here goes:

Multiphonic table from Saunder’s Bite. Blue circled ones need open holes, the red ones are just wrong.

I’ll address them one by one. However, a preface to all of them in general: you are allowed to make substitutions, if a multiphonic just refuses to speak. Find something similar, or replace it with one of the ones given. I also won’t remark on the microtonal variations, some of the written notes are about a quarter-tone off. Don’t sweat it or try to tune it, just use the fingering if it works.

  1. ok
  2. ok
  3. If you don’t have the open hole, I suggest substituting this one with number 5. If you think of another solution, I am curious!
  4. I think this one was meant:

I would substitute number 5 for this one too, if you don’t have an open hole. However, it is used rarely (I’ll have to check, maybe not at all in the final version).

5. ok

6. ok

7. ok

8. Forget the C# in parenthesis. This one needs to be rolled out quite a bit.

9. ok

10. ok

11. ok

12. If you don’t have an open hole, substitute with 11 or thirteen, depending on what sounds better for you in context.

13. ok

14. ok

Some are really tricky to produce, try rolling way more out or in that you normally would, or experimenting with the position of your tongue. Book a Zoom lesson if you really need help. Good luck and have fun with the piece!

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basics contemporary music exercise books & teaching materials extended techniques harmonics or harmonic multiphonics multiphonics practice technique

Getting Started with Multiphonics

I would like to share the following presentation: Getting Started with Multiphonics – with a deep dive into the harmonic structure of the flute sound. Since this is a work in progress, I will share a link to Google Slides instead of putting the content here. That way you can always view the latest version. Share your feedback, ideas, and corrections in the comment section here on this blog.

Big thanks to Julianna Nickel and her flute studio at George Mason University for inviting me to share these ideas. It was great to bounce around these thoughts, hear questions and receive feedback. Thanks to Studio Musikfabrik for initiating and funding this pedagogical initiative, which will result in a tutorial video scheduled to come out sometime in the Spring of 2021.

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1XZQvK567OgoM7MREmTqYzT0j6712FiIURzQJ-AZtrNQ/edit#slide=id.p

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bass flute fourth octave practice technique

(Bore) Size Matters

Several times this year I have had other flutists asking me about my bass flute and whether I was able to play easily in the upper 3rd and into the 4th octave. My Kingma bass flute has a mid-size bore (sorry, don’t know the exact specs) and is able to play up to high C comfortably, high C# and D with effort. When I recorded Mark Barden’s Personae for bass flute and bass clarinet last year, I resorted to borrowing a Pearl bass flute that had a narrower bore, because I could never reliably hit a high E on my Kingma (which is otherwise an awesome instrument!). This passage is an example:

I am posting this to reassure you that if you are a seasoned bass flutist and are having real difficulty with these notes, don’t bang your head against a wall or berate yourself. Check your bore size. If you have one of those lovely large-bored instruments I really envy you – they sound marvelous! But I don’t envy you when you have to play in the 4th octave. Carla Reese sums things up nicely in her guide for buying large flutes:
“In general, a big bore instrument will have a stronger low register and a weaker high register than a small bore instrument. Bigger bores also tend to have a slightly slower response and more difference in tone between registers. Big bores are ideal for playing in flute choirs (especially for the bass) but can be heavier and need more air. Small bores are ideal for solo repertoire, where the demands can require more agility and a stronger high register.”

A colleague of mine who is a woodwind doubler has an extra small-bore Kotato bass flute, he says a high D pops out with hardly any effort.

I wish someone would invent a bass (or alto) flute that has an adjustable bore size!

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